Falandril

Falandril is a phonetic script I discovered, quite by accident, in 1987, in a darkened trailer behind Chapel Hill High School in North Carolina, where I was supposed to be attending an early-morning class in European History. The shapes of the letters have evolved considerably since then, and I have studied and copied them faithfully. Today, I use Falandril as a secret shorthand for taking sensitive notes or for transcribing poetry, primarily in Standard American English. I have found it to be flexible enough to record most European languages. Falandril can express, in modified forms, French, Spanish, German, and Russian and at least one language that may or may not have ever existed.

That language, intriguingly, was called Falandril by its speakers, a people known as the Dvalanu . Falandril was first written in a runic script that appears very similar to the earliest examples of Falandril that I discovered in 1987 (the Dvalanu called their runic script, and the scripts that evolved from it, Dgiribatu, meaning "things that are scratched", but to avoid confusion I refer to both the language and the script as Falandril.) The history of the Dvalanu is obscure. There is no evidence that they did not live some 7,000 years ago in the region now known as Crimea. The Dvalanu would have certainly been scattered when the Mediterranean Sea, which had swollen with meltwater with the rest of the world's oceans as the glaciers retreated on the continents, breached the Bosphorus Strait, drowning a large and fertile crescent around a great freshwater lake under 200 feet of salt water — now the dead shoals of the Black Sea. In their diaspora, presumably, they had contact with Proto-Semitic civilizations, from which they learned the art of letters. The diaspora of the Dvalanu was remarkably complete, so that today there is, plus or minus an order of magnitude, approximately one speaker of Falandril on each of the seven continents of Earth.

Each symbol in Falandril represents a specific phonetic sound or combination of sounds. In other words, there are no silent letters, and few of the peculiar orthographic features of standard written English.

In hand-written Falandril, letters are connected as much as possible, and there are certain common abbreviations and combinations of letters (Falandril has adopted standard English punctuation in recent years; punctuation marks are absent from most earlier texts, and varied widely in form.)

Falandril is a featured conscript on omniglot.com, an excellent online resource on all the world's real and imagnary writing systems.

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Act 1 — English-Falandril Transliteration

Explanation of this text.

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Act 1 — Falandril Translation

Falandril Script

Avalandril Dgiribatu

 

Symbol

Pronuciation

 

Short Vowels

as in banana

as in sat

as in set

as in sit

as in lot

as in put

 

Long Vowels (Note: long e stands for a dipthong in English)

as in father

as in late

as in beet

as in note

as in soon

 

Dipthongs

as in mice

as in boy

as in loud

as in low

OM

 

Semivowels, Glides, Aspiration, Nasals & Liquids

as in yet

as in wet

as in hat

as in what

as in nice

as in mitten

as in miss

as in spasm

as in ripe

as in hunger

as in letter
as in little

as in lasagna

 

Consonants

as in rapid

as in rabbit

as in fit

as in very

as in with

as in wither

as in mitten

as in ridden

as in miss

as in nuzzle

as in fish

as in vision

as in church

as in major

as in walk

as in big

as in sing

 

Consonant Combinations

consonant+r: r becomes diagonal stroke

br

kr

consonant + s (English unvoiced plural)

ts
consonant + z (English voiced plural)
dz

n + consonant: n loses vertical stroke

nt
nk
s + consonant: s elides with following consonant

st

 

Numerals

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

© 2005, Adam S. Trotter
Last updated 18 October 2005
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